Hotel Zaatari: A Short Film That Brings the Human Back to the Refugee

Uncategorized, Writing

Hotel Zaatari is a short film written and directed by two Jordanian filmmakers, Mais Salman and Zaid Baqaeen. The film shows four Syrians from the Syrian city of Daraa near the Jordan-Syria borders who settled in the world’s largest Syrian refugee Camp, Zaatari. With beautiful cinematography and poignant, poetic narration, we are introduced to 13-year-old Ali, 64-year-old Abo Abdo, 52-year-old Hayat, and nine-year-old Sarah. In 17 minutes, the word refugee is stripped of all the politics, the numbers, economics, and pity and the human is re-seen.

According to the film’s website, “the film aims to raise awareness and change perceptions towards the displaced Syrians, and shed light on their plights, fears, hopes and dreams. Challenging the notion of ‘the other’, the film hopes to express and reveal the core of what it is to be human, and what it is to be humane.”

Hotel Zaatari is not only a film but an initiative. Forty limited edition prints from Zaatari are sold to fund programs in the camp in association with Save the Children International.

Watch the film and visit the website.

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Sanaa, Yemen

Alex Potter fotografiert den Jemen

Articles, Translations

Original English post by Kaeleyn Forde:

“Fresh out of nursing school and just 22 years old, Alex Potter dreamed of being a photojournalist and bridging the gap between her home in the Midwest and the Middle East. After graduating from college, Potter left her native Minnesota and traveled to Jordan. When she saw that Yemen, a country on the Arabian Peninsula, had a big election coming up, she hopped on a plane in a matter of hours. Potter has been living in Yemen’s capital, Sana’a, ever since.”

***

German translation:

Frisch von der Universität und nur 22 Jahre alt, träumte Alex Potter davon, eine Fotojurnalistin zu werden und die Lücke zwischen ihrem Heimat im Mitteleren Westen und dem Nahen Osten zu schließen. Nach dem Studium, verließ sie ihrer Heimat in Minnesota und reiste nach Jordanien. Wenn sie sah, dass den Jemen, ein Land auf der arabischen Halbinsel, bald Wahlen durchfuhren wurde, stieg sie nach nur Studen in einem Flugzeug ein. Seitdem wohnt Potter in der Hauptstadt Sana’a.

Read Kaelyn Forde’s full post from August 26, 2015 and view Alex Potter’s eye-opening photo essay of Yemen. Visit Alex Potter’s website and follow her on Twitter and Instagram.

 

A Japanese Surprise…Beware of the Victory Sign

Articles, Translations, Uncategorized

In a strange piece of news, the National Institute of Information in Japan announced that making the v-sign in photos is not recommended, in fact completely unsafe,  as it may lead to identity theft.

According to DP Review, a website concerned with the latest technologies in the world of photography, a report issued by the Institute said that the technology of determining fingerprints has become so unbelievably advanced that it can now determine the hand- or fingerprints of any individual through a simple photo published on SnapChat or any other social media network. They warned that the technology is widely available and easy to use.

According to the Institute, this advancement is thanks to smart phones with high resolution cameras that can capture much detail. Researchers were able to copy fingerprints from a photo that was taken using a mobile phone three meters away from the subject. However, naturally, the copying requires that the fingerprints be clear in the photo and that the photo be taken somewhere bright and that it meets a certain size and quality.

 

Read the original Arabic article published on Al Arabiya on 19 January, 2017.